Hear it here first - competition law updates…

Our readers may be interested in two events next week at which Sophie Lawrance, one of Bristows’ competition partners, will be speaking on issues dear to the heart of this blog. 

On Tuesday 6 December 2016, at the Competition Law in the Pharmaceutical Sector conference, Sophie will be addressing the topic of “Distribution Systems and Parallel Trade”.  Then on Wednesday 7 December at the 10th Annual Standards, Patents & Competition: Law & Litigation conference, there will be a talk and workshop on “The Future of Litigating SEPs”.  Sophie will be joined at that event by fellow Bristows partner and patent litigator James Boon and German patent litigator Kai Rüting of Vossius.  Both events will no doubt provide useful and interesting updates on competition law in these spheres. 

Places are still available for both events so get booking!

Premier League scores in latest dispute with pub broadcasting football matches

The ever-increasing amount of money tied up in TV deals for Premier League football perhaps makes it unsurprising that The Football Association Premier League (“FAPL”) has been willing to litigate on a number of occasions against publicans using foreign satellite services to show football matches in pubs.

Following the CJEU’s decision in the joined cases FAPL v QC Leisure and Murphy (C-403/08 and C-429/08) and the subsequent High Court decision in FAPL v QC Leisure (here) the law in this area is relatively settled. Although FAPL can grant rights on a territorial basis, exclusive licences preventing the supply of foreign satellite decoder cards into other Member States are unlawful. Despite this, the FAPL on-screen graphics and logos incorporated into the live feeds of football matches are copyright protected works. FAPL is therefore able to bring actions for copyright infringement for any unauthorised uses of these. The success of such actions will depend on the terms of the agreement that a decoder card is supplied under.

As an aside, it may be possible for pubs to avoid infringement claims by only switching the screens on at kick-off, and attempting to cover up any FAPL logos and graphics. This would be challenging in practice however, given the frequency in which graphics pop up throughout the matches (for example when a player is booked or a replay is shown).

FAPL v Luxton

The Court of Appeal has recently added to the relevant pool of judicial opinion by rejecting an appeal by Mr Luxton, the proprietor of a pub in Swansea, against the summary judgment granted in favour of FAPL by the High Court in January 2014. Mr Luxton had used a domestic satellite decoder card originally sold by a Danish broadcaster to show Swansea City matches following Swansea’s promotion to the Premier League.  Mrs Justice Rose held that by using a domestic satellite decoder card rather than a commercial one, Mr Luxton was using FAPL’s copyright works without its consent. 

Mr Luxton raised two EU law defences which have now been considered by the Court of Appeal (see here).

The two defences raised

  1. That the proceedings brought by FAPL were an illicit attempt to prevent Mr Luxton from using a foreign decoder card, isolating the UK market from the continental market in breach of Articles 101 and/or 56 TFEU.
  2. The (alleged) illegal arrangements between FAPL and its exclusive licensees in Europe had prevented Mr Luxton from obtaining a commercial foreign card; FAPL should therefore be prevented from exercising its copyright in respect of the domestic foreign card.
The Court of Appeal’s decision

Floyd LJ gave the leading judgment, disposing of both defences relatively quickly. On the first, he noted that in bringing the action, FAPL was relying on the right of a copyright owner to prevent the unauthorised communication to the public of copyrighted works. This right could also be enforced against a person in the UK who used a domestic card issued by FAPL’s UK licensee (Sky) for commercial purposes. The fact that Mr Luxton was using a foreign domestic card did not make any difference; FAPL’s right was not one that depended on the use of the card in a particular territory. Enforcement of the right could not therefore be capable of reinforcing allegedly unlawful agreements to partition the market.  

Regarding the second defence, the judge did not consider Mr Luxton’s use of the domestic card to be a consequence of FAPL’s agreements and practices. Even if the effect of those practices was to starve the market of foreign commercial cards - that did not make the use of foreign domestic cards a natural consequence of FAPL’s actions. Though Mr Luxton thought he had purchased a commercial card rather than a domestic one, this could not change the outcome, as if his argument was correct a publican who deliberately sought out a foreign domestic card would be in the same position.
 
Comments on ‘Euro-defences’

The decision provided some interesting commentary on the overlap between IP and EU/competition law, noting that it “has long been recognised that in some circumstances an intellectual property right may become unenforceable because what lies behind it is an attempt to divide up the market in the EU contrary to the provisions on free movement”. A breach of the Treaty isn’t enough – there must be a sufficient connection between the exercise of the right and the unlawful agreement in question.

Floyd LJ cited Lord Sumption’s warning in Oracle that this sort of ‘Euro-defence’ “must be scrutinised with some care” due to the risk of litigation devaluing intellectual property rights by increasing the cost and delay associated with their enforcement. In that case of course, the Euro-defence was rejected on the grounds that the unlawful conduct relied on was collateral to the particular rights which the claimant was seeking to enforce.

Scope for Commission activity?

A further point of note is that the evidence adduced in this case showed the difficulty of actually obtaining a foreign commercial card.  FAPL accepted that there is an arguable case that foreign broadcasters are still behaving as if they are bound not to provide commercial cards outside their national territories, and that if Mr Luxton had used a commercial card, he would have had an arguable defence that it authorised him to communicate the copyright works to the public in the UK. (Whether this defence would succeed may be the subject of further litigation in the future). 

Cross-border access to digital services is a central part of the Commission’s Digital Single Market Strategy and this is evidently an area in which the Commission is willing to take action – see our thoughts on the Commission’s investigation into Paramount’s pay-TV licensing practices here. This is certainly a space worth keeping an eye on in the future, as if it continues to prove difficult to obtain foreign commercial cards, thereby defeating attempts to deliver digital services across borders, there may be grounds for action by the Commission.

High Court Rules in Article 50 Case

We know it’s not strictly competition law or IP related but Competition and IP practitioners (and indeed the general public) will not have missed the latest Brexit developments. Yesterday, in a landmark ruling on the UK’s constitution, the High Court rejected the Government’s argument that it could trigger Article 50 by exercising its prerogative powers. Parliamentary approval will therefore be needed to invoke Article 50. It was common ground between the parties that Article 50 is irrevocable and the High Court’s ruling is predicated on this. However, the status of Article 50 has been the subject of considerable debate and the issue may need to be resolved before the Supreme Court hears the Government’s appeal. We discuss this here.  

In addition to this, we’ve written two Brexit posts which may also  be of interest:

Now, back to Competition Law and IP…


Resetting Competition Policy Frameworks

Earlier this month, the GSMA – an association representing various mobile operators – published a report: ‘Resetting Competition Policy Frameworks for the Digital Ecosystem’ – see here for an Executive Summary. The GSMA proposes a more nuanced approach to competition policy in the digital economy following the EU Commission’s Digital Single Market initiatives (see previous posts here and here). The GSMA suggests that it is necessary to create a regulatory environment fit for the digital age. We summarise the four main themes below.

Market definition and market power

The study points to: 
  • an unprecedented uptake in new technologies: 
  • an increasing use of big data to gain a competitive advantage (see our opinions here); and 
  • a rising number of cases where price is not the critical factor for consumer decision-making. 
In the light of these findings, it is suggested that competition authorities need to adapt their approach to defining product and geographic markets. Recommendations include:
  • Focussing on the products and services consumers genuinely view as viable substitutes to inform market definition;
  • Investigating how the quality of goods and services which are provided at no monetary cost can be used as part of a market power analysis; and
  • Revising market definitions where there is substantial evidence to do so.
Adopting a total welfare standard in digital markets

The GSMA has urged competition authorities to take into account the effect of conduct on product quality, innovation and economic efficiencies (‘Total Welfare’) rather than simply pricing effects. It proposes that looking at the bigger picture could entail positive effects on investments, quality of products and services and performance in digital markets. Recommendations include:
  • Adopting a total welfare standard to support productivity growth /higher living standards;
  • Focussing on dynamic effects when assessing mergers and competition in digital markets. This might enable certain mergers to be cleared that could benefit society; and
  • Adapting the approach to efficiencies by use of experts, identifying efficiencies in earlier transactions and utilising new analytical techniques. 
Rebalancing ex ante and ex post regulation

The report notes that technologies such as cloud computing, social media, and the use of the Internet of Things are no longer entirely novel but they do continue to alter how businesses operate, and products and services are being offered in new and sometimes unpredictable ways. As entire industries are adapting to this changing digital environment there is a concern that regulating on the basis of predictions (‘ex ante’) could distort competition and deter innovation. GSMA’s study argues that applying competition law in the light of experience and facts (‘ex post’), is more flexible and can be tailored to experience of changing market conditions. Recommendations include:
  • Reviewing the thresholds for ex ante regulation to ensure that the potential negative impact on investment and modernisation that may arise is analysed against any possible gains;
  • Focussing ex ante regulation on enduring market power; and
  • Ensuring consistent and streamlined regulation that conforms to competition law.
Institutional Arrangements 

While noting that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ institutional arrangement, the report calls for competition authorities to be independent and transparent; to adopt policies which support investment and innovation; and to cooperate closely with regulators in moving towards ex post enforcement. 

The GSMA is careful not to criticise the principles currently underpinning competition policy and enforcement in Europe. However, it is firm in the view that features of the competition regulatory framework must be updated to allow digital services the right environment to flourish and to ensure appropriate conditions for competition. That view is not necessarily universal, and it will be interesting to see how others react to the GSMA’s recommendations.

Excessive pricing: the Italian version

Pricing issues in the pharmaceutical industry have continued to keep competition authorities busy, this time with the Italian Market Competition Authority (AGCM) fining the multinational South African pharmaceutical company Aspen near €5.2 million on 14 October 2016, following its finding that Aspen abused its dominance to artificially inflate the price of four of its cancer drugs.

In its press release/statement, the AGCM stated that Aspen, which had acquired the rights to the four essential drugs (Leukeran (chlorambucil), Alkeran (melphalan), Purinethol (mercaptopurine) and Tioguanine (tioguanine)) from GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), had threatened to interrupt their supply to the Italian market in order to compel the Italian Medicines Agency to accept price increases for the drugs of between 300%-1,500% of the initial price. The drugs were described by the AGCM as “irreplaceable” and central to the treatment of blood cancers especially for children and elderly patients. In the relevant period Aspen was the only supplier of these drugs in the Italian market, which led to the finding that Aspen held a dominant position in the relevant national market and had unfairly increased the prices.  The AGCM noted in particular that there was no direct substitute for the drugs, the patents had been expired for years and no economic justification for the price increases could be established.

The antitrust authority applied a two-step test to determine whether the increase in pricing amounted to unfair pricing in contravention of Article 102. The AGCM first established that there was an excessive discrepancy between the manufacturing costs and the final prices of the products and secondly considered that the pricing was excessive and unfair, by reference to factors such as the change in prices and any economic basis for this change, any potential benefits for patients, and conversely any harm to the Italian National Health Service.

There is no easy method for competition authorities (or indeed companies) to determine what constitutes excessive pricing, due to the number of variables involved.  A justified price increase might be due to increased manufacturing costs or could be the reflection of a profitable market or a high-risk marketing strategy, among other factors.  Ultimately, the determination of when a price is excessive remains challenging, and – where pharmaceuticals are involved – may well vary from country to country.  As yet, the impact of excessive pricing on reference prices has not been examined.

Italy is not the only country to look at excessive pricing of off-patent drugs, however.  Another example from the UK (on which we have reported here and here) is the ongoing CMA investigation into the pricing of the anti-epilepsy drug Epanutin by Pfizer and Flynn Pharma (the latter having acquired the marketing rights of Epanutin by Pfizer in late 2012).   The CMA has recently updated its case file to push back the expected date of the conclusion of the investigation, to November 2016. The focus of the investigation is understood to be whether the pricing for phenytoin sodium capsules is excessive and unfair and thus constitutes an Article 102 and Chapter II abuse.

On the other side of the Atlantic, the antitrust authorities have considered similar issues with the 50-fold increase in the price of Turing Pharmaceuticals’ Daraprim and the more recent Mylan EpiPen controversy, caused by a six-fold price rise in the popular emergency allergy treatment.  In September 2016, Mylan became the subject of a congressional hearing on this subject. The allegations about increased pricing were followed by suggestions that Mylan had been misclassifying EpiPen as a generic, as opposed to as a branded product, in order to benefit from the lower rebate rate available (13%) than the equivalent for branded drugs (23%).  In this case, it was of significance that Mylan had a market share of around 90%, and the increase in pricing was accompanied by a direct increase in Mylan’s profits. The US FDA itself was criticised for not intervening more effectively in order to allow competing products to reach the market.

The complex topic of excessive pricing continues to be an issue in the EU more generally.  The announcement of the Aspen investigation has led to calls by public interest bodies such as the BEUC for the Commission to carry out EU-wide investigations into whether companies use similar tactics to increase pricing.  No doubt, as the case law develops, so will our understanding of when a company’s pricing tactics risk being in breach of Article 102.

The European Commission’s E-commerce Conference

On 6 October, the Commission held a conference on its Preliminary Findings of the E-commerce Sector Inquiry: the entire day was made available via webcast (no geo-blocking for the Commission…).  

This follows the publishing of its Preliminary Report last month (which we covered here and here).  The conference was an opportunity for those working in industry, academia and competition authorities around the EU to comment on the findings.  A list of the speakers can be found here.  We have provided a summary of the main issues raised below.

Distribution

In today’s digital world, selective distribution systems are used for a very wide range of products and they are no longer limited to those products which are accompanied by a service.  It was suggested that using selective distribution to ban the use of third party platforms raised important competition law and political questions.

In the context of consumer goods, selective distribution can be beneficial, allowing brands to maintain consistency across retail channels and strengthening consumer protection.  However, it was noted that they can be detrimental to SME retailers, which often struggle to gain market share as a result of restrictive distribution practices.  The need for clear and objective criteria was also raised as an issue.  Some industry representatives called for greater parity between online and brick and mortar stores in terms of the products they are allowed to sell.  This view was not shared by all – others were quick to emphasise the differences between online and physical stores and the benefits of differentiating between these types of sales.  

Turning to the media content sector, the focus was on the use of exclusivity which gives rise to a similar dynamic to selective distribution in the goods economy.  On the one hand, the competition for exclusivity among media organisations has been a driver of innovation and investment in the production of new technologies (e.g. Ultra HD TVs) and has facilitated the creation of more choice among content providers.  On the other hand, distribution contracts are often awarded for lengthy terms and – in the Commission’s view – certain terms risk giving rise to anti-competitive effects.  One example which was discussed was the use of automatic renewal provisions, extending the duration of exclusivity; however, such terms may be justified on the basis of the considerable investment needed to create new content. Such terms will need to be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Cross-border access to content

The paradox that 50% of EU citizens shop online but only 15% shop cross-border was raised as an important issue.  The volume of complaints about geo-blocking directed to National Competition Authorities varied significantly.  Opinions differed on the prioritisation of geo-blocking and territorial restrictions generally.  

The discussion on consumer goods focused on the ability to sell across borders.  Legal fragmentation and lack of harmonisation, personalised products and distribution capacity were all identified as reasons why cross-border sales may be limited.  In addition to technical and logistical barriers, selective distribution systems were also considered to play a part in the availability of products in specific regions. 

Geo-blocking occupied a large part of the discussion on online content distribution.  Industry representatives argued that the territoriality identified in the report is not the result of active efforts by distributors to fragment the market.  Instead, it was said to reflect diverging national demands and differences in the level of investment that broadcasters are prepared to make in each territory.  The possibility of pan-European licences was dismissed as being prohibitively expensive as well as having the potential to be anti-competitive. 

Pricing

Issues surrounding pricing and pricing mechanisms were raised throughout the day.  There was general agreement that the competitive impact of such mechanisms in e-commerce will depend heavily on the level of market power of those imposing the prices.

An interesting point on price discrimination was raised in the context of consumer goods.  If price discrimination is banned, firms adapt by changing their pricing and product strategies, which could harm or benefit consumers depending on the market.  It was noted that vertical restraints could be used strategically by suppliers in the marketplace. 

Pricing mechanisms were also raised as a concern in relation to online digital content.  It was suggested that it might be necessary for the Commission to examine restrictive payment structures in contracts and perhaps regulate the area to ensure a level playing field between mobile platform providers and application developers.

The Commission has invited stakeholders to submit comments on its Preliminary Report by 18 November 2016.  It remains to be seen whether the commentary put forward during the conference and the divergence of industry views will be reflected the Final Report.  Past sector inquiries tend to suggest that the changes between the preliminary and final reports may be few and far between…

Competition defences, patent litigation and costs…

A recent judgment from Mr Justice Roth in the Patents Court highlights the importance of parties considering the sensible case management of competition defences in patent litigation and potential cost implications.

The judgment is from a case management conference in proceedings between several parties including Illumina Inc, Sequenom Inc, and Premaitha Health Plc.  The case is primarily patent litigation that is due to go to trial in July 2017.  In April 2016, the defendant Premaitha Health plc sought to introduce various competition law defences.  Pleadings were already advanced on the technical patent issues and the defendant sought permission to amend its defence.  This was discussed at a CMC in April.  The presiding judge (Mr Justice Birss) adjourned the application to be heard at a later hearing.  The defendant had served its amended pleading only two days before the CMC and so he recognised that the claimants could not be expected to address a wholly new case at such very short notice.  The proposed non-technical defences addressed complex questions under competition law and the claimants were not represented by specialist competition counsel at that first CMC.  Regardless, the defendant pressed the court to grant permission to amend its defences at the first CMC taking the position that the claimants could subsequently on full consideration of the pleadings apply to strike them out or for summary judgment.  The judge (unsurprisingly) did not agree this would be appropriate.  He adjourned the application to a second CMC once the claimants had had time to consider properly the proposed amendments and had been able to give notice of the aspects of the defence to which they objected or consented.  He remarked that if this second hearing did not take place for some reason then the defendant would be given permission to serve the non-technical defences in the form annexed to the defendant’s application.

The second CMC took place on 1 July (the judgment has just been handed down).

Roth J, decided that actually the most appropriate course of action in terms of the efficient conduct of the litigation at this stage would be to further adjourn the non-technical defences application to be restored once the technical judgment had been handed down.  The main reason given is that the precise content of the competition law arguments in this case depends on the scope of the patents.  The market definition alleged by the defendant is framed in terms of patented technology that is an essential input to the allegedly infringing product produced by the defendant.  So any change to the scope of the patent in the technical trial could have a substantial effect on market definition and non-technical arguments that depend on that market definition.  Additionally, the Judge notes that the draft non-technical pleadings are vague and general in places and that a technical judgment would enable a much more sophisticated and tighter focus to be brought on the competition issues.  He also mentions two additional (but subsidiary) reasons why he thinks this is a more sensible approach: (i) the Commission is conducting a competition law investigation which appears to cover the same ground as in the draft non-technical defences (on which we reported here) and further clarity as to the Commission’s investigations should be reached by when the technical judgment in the current proceedings is handed down; and (ii) one of the non-technical defences relates to a settlement agreement between Illumina Inc and Sequenom Inc which to date the defendant has only seen a heavily redacted version.  Roth J suggests that this issue can be dealt with by way of further disclosure in due course which will enable consideration of whether the proposed pleading raises an arguable case.

On costs (which Roth J notes were significant), he ordered that they should be reserved (as a fair assessment requires knowledge of how the matter is going to proceed after judgment in the technical trial) save as to the defendant’s costs which the defendant had to bear.  He stated that an applicant (here the defendant) has a responsibility to consider how its application should sensibly be managed and determined.  He warned “[t]here may perhaps be some lessons from all this. If competition defences are now being introduced on this contingent basis in patent litigation, consideration needs to be given as to how the pleading, and any argument about strike out or summary judgment for the respondent to that pleading, should sensibly be managed. I doubt that this is the last case where such non-technical defences will be introduced”.

This case acts as a reminder of the importance of parties taking a reasonable position when asserting competition law defences in patent litigation and considering how they should best be case managed in the circumstances (or alternatively being prepared for costs consequences).  The facts of this case (notably, the proximity of the raising of the non-technical defences to trial and the defendant’s approach to how strike out or summary judgment should be handled) are not entirely standard and this no doubt had a particular bearing in this case.  However, given the propensity of the UK courts to be inclined to order “patents first, non-technical defences second” in the absence of agreement between the parties to the contrary, and also to defer to any parallel competition law investigation particularly where the alleged non-technical defences concern complex issues of competition law, the outcome is not entirely surprising.  Something for all defendants (and claimants) to keep in mind.

The privacy & competition law overlap: new competition rules on big data?

A few days ago, we reported on the European Data Protection Supervisor’s (EDPS) Opinion on coherent enforcement of fundamental rights in the age of big data (see our post here, and the Opinion here). 

On Thursday 29 September, at a Conference organised by the EDPS and BEUC, Commissioner Vestager gave a speech on Big Data and Competition in which she echoed some of the points raised by the EDPS (see here).

She confirmed that the Commission is “exploring whether we need to start looking at mergers with valuable data involved, even though the company that owns it doesn’t have a large turnover” (because, for example, it has not yet managed to monetise its data). 

Noting that “the competition rules weren’t written with big data in mind”, she also stated that the Commission is conducting an impact assessment on whether national competition authorities need new powers to deal with big data, and hinted that a proposal for new EU legislation, likely a Directive, may be on the table early next year. 

The current prognosis (subject to the outcome of the pending legal challenges) is that the UK may well have triggered Article 50 by then, and may have ceased to be an EU Member State before any such Directive has to be implemented.  This gives rise to the potential for different approaches to the treatment of big data in competition enquiries between the EU and UK post Brexit.

Data Pooling

‘Big data’ tends to be perceived as a (potential) competition issue in the context of tech giants which hold an enormous amount of data.  In her speech, Commissioner Vestager noted that in addition to a single company data set, large amounts of data can also be amassed as a result of several companies pooling their data.  She suggested that this might even be beneficial for competition, enabling smaller companies to compete more effectively with big companies.

However, she also warned that certain risks accompanied this, noting that “companies have to make sure that the data they pool doesn’t give away too much about their business.  Otherwise, it might become too easy for them to coordinate their actions, rather than competing to cut prices and improve their products”.  And of course, if companies are controllers of personal data, they can only share that data subject to applicable data protection laws.

The Commissioner ended her speech by saying that she “will keep a close eye on how companies use data”.  For our part, we will continue to keep a close eye on the EU / UK authorities’ approach to data.

The privacy & competition law overlap: co-operation between enforcement agencies?

Last week, the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) released an Opinion on coherent enforcement of fundamental rights in the age of big data (available here). It builds on a Preliminary Opinion issued by the EDPS in 2014, which aimed to launch a debate on how to apply the EU’s objectives and standards in areas such as data protection, consumer protection and competition more holistically. 

Recognising that the Commission’s wide-ranging Digital Single Market strategy presents an opportunity to launch a new, coherent approach, the EDPS makes recommendations (amongst others) for: (i) how merger controls should take personal data into account, and (ii) a voluntary network where regulatory bodies can share information (a Digital Clearing House). 

Is personal data an asset that should be considered in mergers?

The EDPS Opinion considers that the largest web-based service providers (Google, Amazon etc., some of the biggest companies in the world) “owe their success to the quantity and quality of personal data under their control as well as to the intellectual property required to analyse and to extract value from these data”.  And it’s true that gaining access to customers’ personal data has been a significant factor in some of the big tech acquisitions of the last couple of years (Facebook purchasing WhatsApp for example, or Microsoft’s pending acquisition of LinkedIn). 

In a speech in March this year (here), Commissioner Vestager highlighted the fact that data is an asset, and that it can be a company’s assets rather than turnover that make it an attractive target.  She warned that important deals which warrant review may be missed under the current system, as the acquisition of a company with access to – as yet unmonetised or undervalued – data may not meet the Commission’s turnover test (as with Facebook/WhatsApp, which only fell within the Commission’s remit due to Facebook’s Article 4(5) request).

The EDPS supports greater scrutiny of acquisitions of this sort, and recommends that the expertise of independent data authorities should be utilised to consider the effect of such acquisitions on consumer welfare. 

Is privacy a competition law issue?

Commissioner Vestager downplayed the importance of privacy and data for competition enforcement in a speech in Copenhagen on 9 September (text here).  She noted that “our first line of defence will always be rules that are designed specifically to guarantee our privacy” and that “we shouldn’t be suspicious of every company which holds a valuable set of data”.  However, she did leave the door open for competition enforcement action in this area, recognising that a company in control of a unique set of data may be able to use it to shut rivals out of the market.

The EDPS Opinion also considers the interface between competition and privacy, but with a particular emphasis on personal data.  It speculates that in the near future machine-learning algorithms may be able to exploit differences in consumers’ sensitiveness to price (identifiable from their personal data), enabling firms to segment the market into each individual consumer and charging according to his or her willingness to pay.

Should such an issue arise, it would prompt concerns from data protection authorities about whether personal data was being used in an appropriate way, and from competition authorities about the effect of such use on consumers and the market. 

Surely it makes sense for these authorities to share expertise on these matters?

Digital Clearing House

Even before machine-learning algorithms take over, it’s clear that there are occasions where competition and privacy overlap, and where regulators can help one another.  This already happens on occasion.  The EDPS points to examples such as: 

  • The French competition authority’s interim decision in September 2014 that GDF Suez had abused its dominant position by using personal data collected when it was a state monopoly to later offer a promotion on an open market. 
  • The UK Data Protection Authority advised the CMA on its proposal to invite households who had not switched energy suppliers for three years to opt out from having their details shared with rival suppliers.
  • Germany’s competition regulator, the Bundeskartellamt is currently investigating Facebook’s privacy policies with input from a number of other national authorities – as we reported here.
The EDPS seeks to build on this kind of co-operation, proposing a voluntary network of contact points in regulatory authorities at national and EU level who are responsible for regulation of the digital sector.  Such a network could discuss the most appropriate legal regime for pursuing specific cases or complaints, and could potentially use data protection and consumer protection standards to determine theories of harm relevant to merger control and exploitative abuse cases.

From a competition law perspective, this is not uncontroversial: the relevance of other laws to the competition regime has been rejected on a number of occasions in the past.  Introducing privacy standards could open the floodgates to a need to consider, for example, environmental considerations, or industrial or social policy.  Added to which, there would doubtless be a number of practical challenges to setting up such a network – the first which springs to mind is persuading the diverse authorities involved to listen to one another!

The Brexit shaped spanner in the works

It’s too early to tell what appetite there is across Europe for a Digital Clearing House, but any UK involvement may obviously be affected by Brexit.  Aside from the politics involved, UK authorities may have to apply different legal frameworks to the rest of Europe (see our competition blogs on Brexit here and here, and our colleagues’ blog on the data protection implications here).  We’ll also have to wait and see if the CMA shares the view of the EDPS on the importance of personal data.

Either way, we expect there to be significant developments in this area in the future.

Patent Licensing and the Internet of Things – a Solution?

The Internet of Things (IoT) – a term used to describe the interconnectivity of electronic devices via the internet or wi-fi – is no longer an entirely new phenomenon.  Smart fridges, meters, watches and countless other connectable gadgets which have the ability to store and exchange data have been at the forefront of discussions by tech experts over the last few years.  The next wave of additions to the the IoT includes driverless cars and smart cities – and more as yet unimaginable changes may follow.

Issues such as security and safety, data protection and regulation have added a dash of reality to the otherwise positive picture of the IoT.  Nevertheless, an increasing number of companies are incorporating some form of connectivity into their business plans.  The most recent Ericsson Mobility Report for example, forecasts that there will be approximately 28 billion connected devices by 2021, of which 16 billion will be related to the IoT. 

However, one area that may pose a significant barrier to companies wishing to break into the emerging market of the IoT is in the arrangements to be put in place for the licensing of relevant patents and software.  The market for connected devices could be at risk of being ‘held up’ by IP disputes.  One question that has not yet been comprehensively answered is how makers of connected devices can acquire the licences necessary for their IoT products in a simple and efficient way.  

A possible solution has recently been introduced by a new licensing platform called Avanci.  Backed by Ericsson, Qualcomm and Royal KPN (among others), Avanci builds on the traditional idea of the patent pool. It aims to offer flat rate licences on FRAND terms for a collection of standard essential wireless patents, with the aim of removing the need to negotiate multiple bilateral licences.  If it works, this could speed up the expansion and uptake of the IoT.

The uptake of this initiative is yet to be seen. Its success is likely to depend upon a number of factors including:

  • Whether the licensors are able to find a mutually agreeable pricing structure;
  • Whether the price offered is acceptable to device manufacturers; 
  • The number of patent holders offering their backing to the initiative; and
  • The willingness of manufacturers to take a licence without forcing the patentees to resort to litigation and potentially costly FRAND disputes;
  • How the platform deals with the relationship between its prices and those applicable in any pre-existing bilateral deals.
It is already evident that some aspects of Avanci’s pricing may be controversial – for example, royalty rates will remain fixed regardless of how many patents are added to the platform.  This may sound like good value for licensees, but will it offer sufficient incentives for new licensors to join and make the platform a genuinely one-stop shop?  Or does it suggest that the early prices are likely to be rather high, to allow headroom for further patents to be added.  The use of fixed prices per device rather than percentage rates could also be contested by manufacturers of lower value devices, in particular if they are staring down the barrel of a patent infringement suit.

We will be continuing to monitor this fascinating space…